Wheel of Fortune

Are you Lucky? Unlucky? Little bit of both sometimes?  Mankind figured out the fickle nature of luck a long time ago. Take a look at this painting from the 15th century that depicts Lady Fortuna turning the wheel of fate. In one moment we can be a king, the next a pauper.

 
Coëtivy Master (Henri de Vulcop?) (French, active about 1450 - 1485) Philosophy Consoling Boethius and Fortune Turning the Wheel, about 1460 - 1470, Tempera colors, gold leaf, and gold paint on parchment Leaf: 7.3 x 17 cm (2 7/8 x 6 11/16 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Coëtivy Master (Henri de Vulcop?) (French, active about 1450 - 1485)
Philosophy Consoling Boethius and Fortune Turning the Wheel, about 1460 - 1470, Tempera colors, gold leaf, and gold paint on parchment
Leaf: 7.3 x 17 cm (2 7/8 x 6 11/16 in.)
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

 

Here's what the Getty Museum says about the painting:  

"According to medieval philosophy, Fortuna is a force to be reckoned with: she is inconsistent, fickle, unstable, the opposite of reason. She buffets you like a rock in the middle of the sea. If you look closely at the figure spinning the wheel, you’ll notice that she has two faces: one beautiful, the other dark and vile. These are the two sides of Fortune."

Sound like a bit of a bummer, but it's actually pragmatic and something we all know to be true. The universe is constantly changing around us and we cannot control which way Fortuna will turn the wheel. So why do we spend so much time fixated on good fortune and clinging to hope that things turn out well for us? We should be spending our energy on what is under our control by making the most of every situation we're in. We should only concern ourselves with how we're handling the present moment, not hoping that the future will be better or ruminating about the past.

Easier said than done, of course. We're wired to worry and be afraid. But we can train our minds to be more awake in the present moment and more willing to let go of the past and future.  A great starting point is meditation.  We hope you'll join us at Connect Yoga on Sundays for Zen meditation.  It's a great starting point to start practicing letting go and allowing the wheel to turn as it may.